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October 1, 2021

Current Progressive Forage Digital Edition

The hay market has evolved almost as much as the equipment in the last decade. Keep up with the latest strategy on how to sell your hay, and if the investment of hay preservative applicators is worth it for you. Read about how to deal with hay after a hurricane or flood.

Knowing the value of your cropland and pastureland is an important part of your management strategy, and overcooking family dysfunction can be even more of a challenge.

Take a look at the road less traveled, and how one Nebraska producer is making organic certifications fit his program. All this and more in the October 1 issue of Progressive Forage.

2021

Progressive Forage Issue 1 2021

January 1

Everybody’s doing it - looking for ways to diversify amid continuing market uncertainty. In this issue, Western Forage Resource manager Chad Hale discusses critical decision points and bottlenecks as you explore those opportunities. And faced with winter grazing, there may be more nutrition in those stockpiled forages than you know. Caitlin Hebbert from the Noble Research Institute shares insights on forage quality after frost.

Let cover crop calculators do the work for you. From carbon-to-nitrogen ratios to termination costs, several apps and calculators take the confusion out of selecting a cover crop mix to fit your needs. Freelancer Martha Hoffman Kerestes talks with producers and companies to find these resources. Also, Utah State Extension Specialist Matt Yost talks about the nitrogen credits for small-grain forages after alfalfa and how to maximize them.

The most comprehensive hay report in the industry is waiting for you in this month’s issue.

Progressive Forage Issue 2 2021

February 1

Few crops are as flexible as small grains. The many options give rise to just as many questions about which variety to use and in what circumstances. Author Chad Hale identifies small grains options in this issue. Additionally, Jaclyn Krymowski’s article takes a deeper look into ryegrass – its advantages and disadvantages.

What’s in alfalfa’s future? Continued efforts to improve alfalfa’s protein include moving genes from red clover to alfalfa and moving tannin-producing genes from other legumes to alfalfa. These and other breeding goals continue to enhance alfalfa’s place in livestock diets, and author Dan Undersander explains some of these.

Also in this issue, did you know old-timers used to mow first-cutting cool-season grasses when dandelions began to turn? John Winchell looks at growing degree days, the maturity cycle and factors that correlate to that practice.

The most comprehensive hay report in the industry is waiting for you in this month’s issue.

Progressive Forage Issue 5 2021

May 1

Water, water: Wouldn't it be nice? This issue of Progressive Forage covers water availability and irrigation possibilities. Learn about new soil sensing technology that provides data for more accurate irrigation recommendations.

Kick off the hay season on the right foot by evaluating your process from the end to the beginning. Know what to look for when buying a mower, and before conditioning hay and haylage. Break down the economics before investing in a remoisturizing process.

Progressive Forage Issue 6 2021

June 1

The June issue of Progressive Forage focuses on pasture production. Get some pointers on the intricate dance that is pasture management, and check out our cover story on the possibilities of hybrid rye. Also included is forage quality. See what immediate wrapping can do to preserve silage quality, and learn about the impact of bad weather on nutritive quality of forages. Lastly, get some tips on preventing haystack fires.

Progressive Forage Issue 7 2021

July 15

Silage season is in full swing, learn best practices for storage to avoid feed shrink in the field and at the trough. Keep your crew safe this safe this summer with our customer harvesting field guide. The drought continues to be a factor for many in the West so beware the biological risk the drought poses.

From the business office, develop a strong business plan to ease succession planning. A strong community can get you by in our hard times, but connecting is the first step. Looking ahead, know what to expect from the late summer and fall seed market. All this and more in our mid-summer issue of Progressive Forage.