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Silage

Plan your silage production from seed selection to harvest and packing the pile with tips from these ag professionals.

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Growing conditions determine fiber digestibility, and the right combination of weather conditions make for an optimum silage crop, say experts at Pioneer Hi-Bred, a DuPont business.

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Silo gas forms after chopped green forages are harvested, placed into storage and begin to ferment.

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The impact that wet weather has on your silage dry matter content depends to a great extent on where it’s stored. Tower silos aren’t affected much at all; neither are silage bags as long as you do like many farmers do and fold a hunk of bag plastic over the feeding face.

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High-moisture corn offers growers and feeders several advantages, especially when high feed costs are a major concern. High-moisture corn is a high-energy feed for both dairies and feedlots. There definitely are more advantages than disadvantages for operators who are feeding corn.

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The process of producing silage involves harvesting a fresh forage crop at a near-neutral pH from the field, putting that crop into an enclosed storage system of some sort (e.g., bales, bags, bunkers, pits, piles, towers, etc.) and acidifying the material to reduce its pH, which prevents the growth of spoilage organisms.

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When corn is standing in the field, two primary harvest options exist: combine grain or chop silage.

Determining what the grain is worth is easy. Multiply grain yield by bushel price. Subtract harvest, hauling, drying and storage costs if you desire net returns.

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