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Silage

Plan your silage production from seed selection to harvest and packing the pile with tips from these ag professionals.

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The 2020 corn production season has gotten off to a relatively “normal” start. Timely planting occurred – a welcome change compared to the previous three seasons, when colder and wetter conditions influenced planting progress.

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Chopping silage

Starting with the final result in mind is a good approach when it comes to chopping silage. Chopping is only part of the equation, as farmers have storage and animal conversion to manage as well.

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Mycotoxin contamination can affect even the most well-run dairy farms. It’s important for farmers to detect mycotoxins early so they can mitigate the risk to their animals and minimize any future health and production issues that could arise in the future.

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Soybeans can be harvested as a hay or silage crop. Soybean forage, similar to most legumes, tends to be high in protein and low in fiber (relative to grasses), making soybeans an excellent forage if harvested properly.

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The word silage comes from the Greek word “siros” – a pit or hole in the ground used to store corn. Archaeological evidence indicates the Greeks and Egyptians were utilizing silage to feed livestock possibly as far back as 2000 BC.

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Silage is a great option to integrate into your feeding program, but it is not a cheap endeavor. Aside from the time spent growing the crop, the process of storing it effectively to preserve quality can be time-consuming and costly. The traditional plastic and tire method can be a safety hazard for employees and creates waste that ends up in a dumpster if not recycled.

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