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Forage Types

Hay, silage and pasture is your business, and it's our focus. Take your operation to the next level with the help of our comprehensive and practical information, education and technology about various forage types.

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A common management problem faced by most hay or livestock producers is weed and brush infestation. Weed species compete with desirable forage species for sunlight, moisture and nutrients.

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A drive through the countryside where livestock are fed and cared for will reveal large, white, stuffed, plastic bags lying adjacent to farm buildings. These flexible feed structures store tons of haylage or corn silage.

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“I highly recommend inoculants for everyone. It won’t increase the nutrient content of your silage, but your silage will maintain quality rather than losing it,” says Hugo Ramirez of Iowa State University Extension.

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New landowners sometimes face a daunting challenge: how to make the most of newly acquired pastureland that has been overgrazed for years. The soil may lay bare, incapable of the forage production necessary to support a substantial number of animals.

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Forages play an integral role on any livestock operation. In many parts of the South, the ability to grow both warm- and cool-season forages allows producers to benefit from grazing throughout most of the year on their operations.

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Tall fescue is a mainstay of the American beef cattle industry. It grows on about 35 million acres of pastureland in the eastern U.S. University recommendations in the Mid-Atlantic region generally suggest applying 60 to 80 pounds of nitrogen in late summer (end of August) to stimulate forage growth with the onset of cooler weather in the fall.

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