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Grasses and Grazing

Learn about pasture management, stocking rates and grass production from beef and dairy specialists and agronomists around the country.

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Editor’s note: This is the first in a series of three articles. Part 2 can be found in the Issue 4, 2012 Progressive Forage Grower, or click here to read Part 2. Part 3 can be found in the Issue 9, 2012 Progressive Forage Grower, or click here to ready Part 3.

Fences can significantly increase livestock grazing efficiency. The first step in planning livestock fencing is determining the purpose and goals of the fencing program.

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Pasture walks are one method used by extension educators, Natural Resource Conservation Services, Soil and Water Conservation Districts, or industry reps to showcase operations, highlight approved practices and products, or just as a platform to promote forage and pasture grazing management.

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Aeration – a process by which soil is mechanically disturbed – is commonly used to renovate established pastures, with the objective of increasing forage production.

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Franzen said, “If biological diversity is declining, if topsoil is eroding, if water resources are being depleted or an increase of inputs challenges solvency, the system is not sustainable.” This is as true today as it was 50 years ago, perhaps more so.

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Though many warm-season grass pastures are dormant this time of year, the extended drought has reduced normal forage production somewhere near 70 percent of the usual seasonal total.

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Intense livestock grazing over a relatively short period of time can benefit rangelands, according to a study published by Idaho State University researchers.

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