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Producer Features

We bring you feature articles on successful forage producers and their business models to help you enrich your management style.

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As a cash crop, the value of all dry hay harvested in 2015 was estimated at $16.84 billion, trailing only corn ($49.04 billion) and soybeans ($34.54 billion).

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Wade Hill is a forage producer in Danville, Alabama. His main hay marketing focus is for the horse industry, although he also sells hay to cattle producers on a limited basis. In addition to off-farm sales, Hill produces forages for his own livestock – horses, cattle and swine.

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In a state of 10,000 lakes, water law rules the land.

At Stoney Creek Farm, near Redwood, Minnesota, Grant Breitkreutz knows conservation isn’t just good practice;

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For years, Chris Penrose, a producer living in the Appalachian foothills on a “hilly” farm, used his resources from the farm to manage other financial priorities (debt, college, etc.).

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What’s a two-bucket gal? A two-bucket gal is a woman who can do two or more things at once: helping on the farm, no matter what the job; wash the family’s greasy clothes; have lunches ready; run the tractor, planter or whatever needs running; manage the house; and be the glue of the family.

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Mark Kennedy from Houston, Missouri, doesn’t produce any hay. He grazes cattle, sheep and goats on his rocky, hilly ground, and buys whatever hay he needs. He grazes about 320 to 340 days per year, and tries to have 60 days worth of hay on hand in case the weather doesn’t cooperate. In good years, he may not have to feed any hay, but on dry years, he may have to feed hay 65 days or so.

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