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Planting

Seed selection is only the beginning to a plentiful forage harvest; check out additional articles on soil testing, root development and timing to help you succeed.

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No-till seeding of forage grasses and legumes can be successful and has become an accepted practice according to John Hobbs, an agriculture and rural development specialist with University of Missouri Extension.

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Unless farmers want to chance reduced yields, they should probably stick with inoculating their clover seed themselves, according to a Texas AgriLife Research forage scientist.

"Or they should realize that they'll need to plant the coated seed at a higher rate per acre to get the same yields," said Dr. Gerald Evers, AgriLife Research forage management expert.

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Fall is a season for planting small grains, annual ryegrass, tall fescue, annual clovers, perennial clovers and alfalfa. This article will provide an overview of various fall forage species.

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University of Illinois Extension educator Jim Morrison recommends establishing alfalfa fields with six to eight inches growth before a killing frost occurs. The following advice was provided in a August 5 news release from the University of Illinois Extension:

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For more than 25 years many forage producers have been successful in no-till seeding small-seeded crops. In recent years with the introduction of more no-till drills, more and more producers are adopting no-till as the preferred method of forage crop establishment.

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Frost on young corn doesn't necessarily mean the "kiss of death," says R.L. Nielsen of Purdue University.

"What is more important is whether the temperature that accompanied the frost event was lethal or not," he says. "Most agronomists agree that 'lethally cold' temperatures for young corn are those that dip to 28 degrees Fahrenheit or lower for some minimum length of time.

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