Read the current Progressive Forage digital edition
advertisement
breadcrumbs

Forage Production

Whether you graze, chop, ensile, bag or bale forage, we offer practical information for your hay, silage and pasture needs.

LATEST

As our ability to analyze forage for more and more specific parts of fiber, protein and fats grows, the metrics we use are often confusing to the many who read the reports. Are they necessary? Which parts are important and for what? Are they for the nutritionist?

Read more ...

Debates about uncoated, light-coated (9 percent) and heavy-coated (34 percent) alfalfa seed are common among seed sellers and farmers.

Read more ...

Corn silage is one of the most commonly fed forages in the U.S. However, it often leaves soil bare between fall harvest and spring planting.

Read more ...

Silage and earlage can be important sources of energy and other nutrients for growing beef cattle and also sources of roughage for finishing cattle.

Read more ...

 While our winter weather is behind us, equipment that wasn’t started (and even those that were) may begin to exhibit the battery drain of the past season.

Read more ...

It’s a killer on equipment tires. A juvenile delinquent with a hunting knife probably couldn’t do as much damage as cornstalks can. The outer stalk surface really wears on pickup teeth, rake tines, cams, bearings and slip clutches. Yet, although cornstalk baling is extremely hard on equipment, more and more producers are turning toward the practice.

Read more ...