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MANAGEMENT

Manage employees, analyze yield drivers, explore forage markets, become more confident in preparing farm financial statements, and untangle farm succession issues.

LATEST

Taking advantage of planning opportunities now will set your forage/grazing operation up for success come spring. Here is a list of things you can do now that will help ensure a successful growing and grazing season.

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As we approach the fall cover crop planting season, the industry is starting to see shortages of a few different crops like radishes, hairy vetch and annual clovers due to the record amount of acreage that was planted last year as part of USDA’s prevent plant program.

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A proactive man will never get caught with his pants down in the bathroom…. why? A proactive man would take the step of locking the door to make sure any future problems would not occur, while the reactive man will go through an embarrassing moment that might set his initial goal back a little.

How does this pertain to Forages? Every producer has the opportunity to be proactive or reactive during the growing seasons. Year after year Mother Nature will start with a green spring, move to the heat of summer, cool off again for fall and put most things to sleep for a cold winter, speaking from the Midwest. Year after year you will have gaps in your forage production that will cost you money with purchased feed and hay that should be saved for the winter months. A proactive producer will see those gaps and plant a forage crop that will excel in that time of year to help carry production on to the next season.

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“You cannot manage what you do not measure.” It’s a phrase that rings true and one that every soil lab knows well. Another common message proclaims: “Soil testing doesn’t cost, it pays!”

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Cover crop consultant David Kleinschmidt discusses key factors producers need to consider before setting up a trial and what data to collect.

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Often, I consult with livestock producers testing forage for their animals. Inevitably there are two numbers on the report they are most concerned with, protein and relative feed value (RFV). Protein is an important value to understand if the forage meets animal requirements, and RFV is a useful index to quickly compare or rank forages.

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