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Harvest & Storage

Forage quality doesn’t increase after harvest, so it’s critical to achieve optimal harvest and store it right to reduce loss. Let our experts tell you how.

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In the Midwest, the primary factor that influences quality of harvested dry forage is weather. In many instances, wet spring weather delays the first cutting, resulting in mature hay that is decreased in quality, palatability and digestibility.

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In today’s challenging economic times, it is more important than ever to know the value of the alfalfa forage you feed your dairy or beef cattle.

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Plastic-wrapped round bale silage (also know as baleage) is harvested forage preserved by anaerobic fermentation of sugar and starch in the forage-making acids that lowers pH levels and preserves the forage.

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Areas across the continent are beginning to see a new change in traditional hay production. While parts of the country have been utilizing baleage for years, it hasn’t been seen coast-to-coast, so to speak, until recently.

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The raking step is sometimes taken for granted in the production of quality hay, but how a rake handles the hay can materially impact raking speed, forage quality and profitability.

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After feeding cornstalks, probably the lowest-cost way to feed cattle in the fall and winter is to stockpile forages.

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