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Harvest & Storage

Forage quality doesn’t increase after harvest, so it’s critical to achieve optimal harvest and store it right to reduce loss. Let our experts tell you how.

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Five hundred miles – that is the travel radius of Jay Procter Farms Inc., based in central Texas in the small community of Lingleville.

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Hay and haylage often contain more dirt than many growers or livestock producers realize. Since dirt is mostly silica (sand), it has very little nutritional value. In forages, the amount of dirt contamination can be estimated by measuring the ash content of the forage.

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As far back as 1,000 B.C., alfalfa was the preferred feed for domesticated animals. Wildlife knew it was a preferred feed long before that and used it for cover and nesting as well.

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Many areas of the country have been dry again this past summer, leaving livestock producers with short pastures and declining grass quality. For many operators, hay inventories are critically low.

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Feeding high-quality alfalfa hay to dairy cows is vital for maximum performance and efficiency. Alfalfa hay baled with more retained leaves will have a higher feeding value to meet the demand of dairy farms.

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Western hay growers have earned the reputation of producing high-quality grass and alfalfa hay. These growers export millions of tons of “dry” hay within the region, across the U.S. and to worldwide ports.

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