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Harvest & Storage

Forage quality doesn’t increase after harvest, so it’s critical to achieve optimal harvest and store it right to reduce loss. Let our experts tell you how.

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In this video from Saskatchewan Agriculture, Livestock Specialist Naomi Paley and Regional Forage Specialist Todd Jorgenson discuss the importance of feed testing and demonstrate how to obtain a proper feed sample.

Jim and Connie Umble have been haying for about 20 years on the Wyoming-Nebraska border. During hay season, they systematically set their alarm clocks alternately throughout the night, taking turns waking up to check the humidity gauges to see if the dew has come and the hay is ready to bale.

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Producers who feed corn silage to their dairy cows or custom chop for customers understand the significance of good silage processing. As planning begins for this fall’s corn silage harvest, it’s a good time to ensure your operation is prepared for proper chop length and kernel processing of corn silage.

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Five hundred miles – that is the travel radius of Jay Procter Farms Inc., based in central Texas in the small community of Lingleville.

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Hay and haylage often contain more dirt than many growers or livestock producers realize. Since dirt is mostly silica (sand), it has very little nutritional value. In forages, the amount of dirt contamination can be estimated by measuring the ash content of the forage.

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As far back as 1,000 B.C., alfalfa was the preferred feed for domesticated animals. Wildlife knew it was a preferred feed long before that and used it for cover and nesting as well.

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