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Harvest & Storage

Forage quality doesn’t increase after harvest, so it’s critical to achieve optimal harvest and store it right to reduce loss. Let our experts tell you how.

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Feeding high-quality alfalfa hay to dairy cows is vital for maximum performance and efficiency. Alfalfa hay baled with more retained leaves will have a higher feeding value to meet the demand of dairy farms.

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Western hay growers have earned the reputation of producing high-quality grass and alfalfa hay. These growers export millions of tons of “dry” hay within the region, across the U.S. and to worldwide ports.

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This year’s record rains have caused different problems for hay producers than the droughts of years past. Unlike recent years, forage quality – not quantity – will be the big issue in meeting the nutritional needs of livestock. But how do you measure forage quality?

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Recently, I was asked to speak at a chopper school in Turlock, California, hosted by Mycogen Seed. We talked about two main points: Corn silage comes in during one period of time each year and requires intense management because you will feed that for the next 12 months or more, and kernel processing will help or hurt your feed cost and ultimately your bottom line – it’s your choice. Finally, are we doing what the cows need as we improve technology at harvest?

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When traveling by mule, sometimes the hardest part is packing the saddle. It’s like solving a puzzle.

Packing silage for optimal density is a different kind of puzzle – one that relies on science to achieve an anaerobic, oxygen-free environment ideal for fermentation. But whether packing mules or packing silage, the right balance of weight is used to achieve optimum results.

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Most livestock producers can tell you the exact day they will be out of hay.

The current hay situation has put extra emphasis on harvesting as much high-quality hay as possible this hay season.

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