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Harvest & Storage

Forage quality doesn’t increase after harvest, so it’s critical to achieve optimal harvest and store it right to reduce loss. Let our experts tell you how.

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In Texas, corn silage harvest begins early. By late June, when corn is rather green and dry matter hovers around 28 percent, tractors and choppers head out to the fields to start cutting down stalks.

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Ensiled forage crops can vary considerably in composition from season to season, within a harvest season and also with time of storage.

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In humid climates there can be severe penalties associated with storing hay outside without protection from the elements.

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Losses begin at cutting: That’s the most basic hay and forage fact in relation to quality. Once the blade slices a hay stem, the quality race is on!

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Farmers deal with many variables when it comes to raising a crop, be it changes in the weather or changes in unsettled markets, but the act of harvesting can be one ray of stability when left to professional custom harvesters.

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Custom harvesting of forage crops today is akin to the old thrashing days when a community would pool its money and buy a community thrasher because no farmer could afford to own it by himself.

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