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Harvest & Storage

Forage quality doesn’t increase after harvest, so it’s critical to achieve optimal harvest and store it right to reduce loss. Let our experts tell you how.

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We all hate to leave strips of uncut crop, commonly called “skips,” in our hay fields. There’s not much yield wasted, but pride of a clean-cut field is often lost to local cafe gossip.

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 Click here to read a question submitted by a reader regarding cutting and drying hay.

If we understand and use the biology and physics of forage drying properly, not only does hay dry faster and have less chance of being rained on, but the total digestible nutrients (TDN) of the harvested forage are higher.

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The question arises often as to which grade of hay is a “better buy” or how does the price for hay compare on a nutrient or feed value basis.

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During these times of unpredictable weather and relatively short hay supplies, hay growers need all the help they can get to maximize the quality of the forages they put up.

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Silage management begins with evaluation – of the stored silage in a bunker or pile and of the products used to protect it.

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Between summer rains and baling challenges, making high-quality hay can be difficult. Further, silage production for many small and moderate-sized livestock producers is prohibitive because of the costs of equipment and storage.

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