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Harvest & Storage

Forage quality doesn’t increase after harvest, so it’s critical to achieve optimal harvest and store it right to reduce loss. Let our experts tell you how.

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The length of cut of forages, whether it is haylage, corn silage or another forage crop, has an impact on the final forage quality in several ways.

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Management decisions that impact forage availability, such as forage species/cultivar to plant, fertilizer and weed control needs, along with herd genetics, are very important to the bottom line of any cattle farm.

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Typically forage producers refer to the two establishment periods for forage crops as spring and fall. Actually the second period is mid-to- late summer, not fall.

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Nobody wants to mess with a wet dog or a wet bale of hay. Baling wet hay can increase moldiness, heat-damage crude protein or occasionally result in hay fires.

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Producing forage with an ideal dietary cation-anion difference (DCAD) for dry cows can be a challenge. For dry cows, DCAD values less <0 mEq per kg are desirable, with -50 to -120 mEq per kg considered ‘ideal’.

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The cutting schedule a grower imposes strongly impacts the overall profitability of an alfalfa operation due to its direct effect on yield and forage quality.

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