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Harvest & Storage

Forage quality doesn’t increase after harvest, so it’s critical to achieve optimal harvest and store it right to reduce loss. Let our experts tell you how.

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0112fg_forage_folks_1Drive-over piles have become popular storage systems for many livestock operations today, but too often this silage never makes it from the pile to the feed bunk.

This loss in feed is commonly referred to as “shrink” and is measured by subtracting the total tons of silage fed from the total tonnage ensiled.

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Hay growers have traditionally been advised not to harvest alfalfa when the cutting is likely to take place four to six weeks before the first killing frost.

Harvesting at that time can put the crop at increased risk of winterkill.

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Fires that damage or destroys hay and barns – resulting in building replacement, feed replacement and lost revenues – cost area farmers thousands of dollars each year.

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As corn silage growers near their anticipated harvest date, it’s important to walk fields to determine how the crop is progressing.

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The drought has stressed most of the crops we are growing. Most farmers got at least one cutting (and often two). Then stress has reduced growth over the last month.

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Stockpiled forage is forage allowed to grow and accumulate for use at a later time or during a period of forage deficit.

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