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Harvest & Storage

Forage quality doesn’t increase after harvest, so it’s critical to achieve optimal harvest and store it right to reduce loss. Let our experts tell you how.

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Research trials in the eastern U.S, in which large round bales are stored outside without protection for six months or more, found dry matter losses of 30 percent or greater to be common.

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An adequate stand of plants with high vigor is necessary for high yields and the opportunity for high forage quality. Profitability during stand life is largely determined by the establishment phase of alfalfa production.

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Today’s producers continue to strive to produce the highest-quality hay possible.

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The forage needs of the equine industry are changing, presenting forage growers an opportunity to adapt operations to profit from an emerging niche market.

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A sustained warming trend heats soils, which tells plants to grow, but day length tells them it’s not time yet. Research looks at how plants are coping with fluctuations.

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Disc-type mowers have revolutionized hay mowing by eliminating cutter bar clogs and by increasing the speed at which an acre of hay can be mowed. Disc machines come in pull-type models, with or without conditioners, and three-point-hitch-mounted models, with some manufacturers offering attached conditioners.

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