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Fertilizing

Nutrient management is essential to soil health and we’ve contacted the experts to guide you – read their tips for raising a successful forage crop.

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Nitrogen is one of the most important and costliest plant nutrients, especially for cattle producers. Knowledge of the nitrogen cycle is an important start in shaving costs off of this expensive fertilizer.

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Farmers usually enjoy a yield boost when corn is planted following an alfalfa crop.

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Hay producers in the Southeast rarely have to look far for fertilizer. With billions of broiler chickens in production, there’s usually plenty of poultry litter around.

The mixture of chicken droppings and used bedding material has routinely been spread on hay fields as fertilizer. The hay is harvested and fed to cattle. It’s a beneficial relationship that’s worked for decades.

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Rotating alfalfa with corn can increase corn yield potential through improved soil physical properties that enhance water infiltration and root extension, a reduction in disease and pest pressure (i.e., corn rootworm) and an enhanced soil microbial community.

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It’s about time to get serious about the use of sulfur in forage fertilizer programs. That’s because government efforts at reducing air pollution have resulted in removing much of this essential nutrient from precipitation. That’s good for air quality but not for the sulfur status of cropland.

A generation ago there was so much sulfur in precipitation that acid rain was big news and some Adirondack and New England lakes were reported to be “dying.” We don’t hear much about acid rain now because the amount of sulfur in precipitation is a fraction of what it used to be.

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If you want to increase your pasture’s productivity next year, you need to prepare your pasture for the winter this fall. Follow these three steps to maximize your pasture’s nutritional value for next spring:

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