Read the current Progressive Forage digital edition
advertisement
breadcrumbs

Forage Production

Whether you graze, chop, ensile, bag or bale forage, we offer practical information for your hay, silage and pasture needs.

LATEST

The phone dings. It’s a text message from a strange number inquiring about your hay for sale. Hesitant and a bit perplexed, you respond. After a few messages back and forth, your gut tells you something’s not quite right – it’s a scam.

Read more ...

Landowners may choose to replant a pasture for many reasons, including invasive plants, drought impacts, wildlife concerns or changes in the ranch operation. What to plant should always be based on established goals for the property. Do you want to solely manage for livestock forage or does wildlife hunting or viewing add to the value or recreational opportunities on your land?

Read more ...

Last year, I had the opportunity to attend a talk on the “Forage Toolbox” by Dennis Hancock. It reminded me there is no one right way to have a forage program, but we should continually assess all the available tools in our toolbox and use them as and when necessary to achieve our production goals.

Read more ...

Over-seeding clovers into poor producing or grass-dominated pastures by broadcast in late winter is a practice that has been done for years usually with some level of success. Adding legumes into pasture improves grazing quality and increases the forage amount that can be removed (up to a 50 to 100 percent increase in production when using legumes as a small percentage of the grass pasture). Introducing a legume into a grass pasture can also reduce the amount of applied nitrogen fertilizer since the legume will fix nitrogen and provide the existing grass with a substantial portion of the nitrogen these components need to grow.

Read more ...

My father had a favorite saying: “You never have time to do it right, but you always find time to do it over.” The fact I remember this bit of fatherly advice may provide a clue as to how many times he told me.

Read more ...

Essentially everything we do as forage growers is to maximize the conversion of solar energy into digestible energy. We do not use photovoltaic cells. We use photosynthetic cells.

Read more ...